FIFO vs LIFO – What’s the Difference?

fifo-vs-lifo

There are three different inventory valuation methods: First In, First Out (FIFO), Last In, First Out (LIFO) and average cost.

With FIFO it is assumed that when a product is sold, it was the oldest product in inventory (‘First In’). As a result, the ending inventory is assumed to exist of the most recent purchases.

With LIFO it is assumed that to most recent purchase is sold. Thus, the ending inventory is assumed to exist of ‘old’ units (which physically need not be the case, as it is an assumption). With increasing prices (and non-decreasing inventory), net income using LIFO is lower than under FIFO.


When to Use FIFO or LIFO?

To determine the cost of a product that is sold, a firm can either determine the original cost of that specific unit, or, when goods are similar, make an assumption about the ‘flow’ of goods for costing purposes. When goods are not similar in nature – for example a gallery selling paintings of the masters of the 1700’s – it makes sense to tag products or in some other way keep track of the products’ original cost. This way, when a product is sold, the original cost can be matched as the cost of goods sold.

When products are (very) similar or identical, it makes less sense to keep track of the original cost. Consider for example an oil trader. The main interest of an oil trader is today’s oil price, and when a barrel is sold, there is not much to gain to retrieve the cost of that specific barrel. He might as well have sold another (physically essentially the same) barrel that could have had another cost. In situations like this, it makes sense to assume a ‘cost flow’. I consider three cost flow assumptions: First In, First Out (FIFO), Last In, First Out (LIFO) and average cost.

Note that when a firm chooses between FIFO and LIFO it basically makes a decision of where it wants recent prices to go: if it prefers recent prices to be the basis for the valuation of ending inventory, the firm chooses FIFO. If it wants the cost of goods sold to be based on recent prices, it chooses LIFO. In this context it is relevant to know that under IFRS, LIFO is not allowed. Apparently, the IASB (International Accounting Standard Board; the standard setting body) believes the balance sheet to be more important than the income statement.

Finally, the average cost assumption assumes that all units have the same (weighted) average cost. The resulting cost of goods sold and ending inventory valuation are therefore between the numbers based on FIFO and LIFO.

When the firm uses the perpetual inventory system, the firm will need to assign a cost to the products at the time of sale, as the inventory T-account needs to be up-to-date at all times. In the situation that the periodic inventory system is used, the company can (and usually will) wait till the end of the period to determine the cost of goods sold. This affects the cost of goods sold (and ending inventory valuation) for the LIFO and average cost.

For example, if the firm uses the periodic system with LIFO and after the last sale but in the same period another purchase is made, it is assumed that this later purchase is sold first! Physically it is not possible to sell (and deliver) a product that has not been purchased by the firm. Accounting-wise it is nonetheless possible, since the calculations for the periodic inventory system are made at the end of the period when all the period’s transactions are know.


FIFO vs LIFO Example

The following information is available about inventory, purchases and sales:

Beginning inventory 1 unit of 10
Sale 1 unit
Purchase 1 unit for 9

The cost of goods sold and ending inventory depend on the choices for inventory system and cost flow assumption:

Method Cost of goods sold Ending inventory
FIFO (either perpetual, or periodic) 10 9
Perpetual LIFO 10 9
Periodic LIFO 9 10
Perpetual average cost 10 9
Periodic average cost 9.5 9.5

FIFO and LIFO Explained

Key points:

– when products are (very) similar, a cost flow assumption is used for costing purposes; three common cost flow assumptions are FIFO (first in, first out), LIFO (last in, first out) and average cost

– With FIFO it is assumed that when a product is sold, it was the oldest product in inventory (‘First In’)

– With LIFO it is assumed that to most recent purchase is sold. Thus, the ending inventory is assumed to exist of the oldest products

– the average cost assumption assumes that all units have the same (weighted) average cost

– with the perpetual inventory system, the cost of goods sold is determined at the time of sale

– with the periodic inventory system, the cost of goods sold is determined at the end of the period

– the perpetual and periodic inventory system can lead to different results for LIFO and average cost

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